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Sports & Orthopaedics

  • Orthopaedic Specialist Consultation: $120 (w/GST)

    Orthopaedic specialist consultation

    Without diagnosis and treatment, serious muscle tears may worsen. Proper treatment can potentially improve your quality of life.

    At Mount Elizabeth Hospitals, our team of specialised orthopaedic surgeons, physiotherapists and occupational therapists work together to diagnose and treat your condition. Any injury should not be taken lightly.

    Don't wait to get treated. Call 6812 3766 to make an appointment with an orthopaedic specialist.

    Email for Consultation Find a Specialist

    Participating Specialists

    Dr Jeffrey Chew Dr Lee Eu Jin Dr Razmi Rahmat Dr Tan Chyn Hong
    Dr Chin Pak Lin Dr Kevin Lee Dr Seow Kang Hong Dr Tan Ken Jin
    Dr Chua Soo Yong Dr Leslie Leong Dr Siow Hua Ming Dr Tay Chong Kam
    Dr Andrew Dutton Dr Lim Jit Kheng Dr Kanwalijt Soin Dr Gowreeson Thevendran
    Dr Leon Foo Dr Lim Mui Hong Dr Michael Soon Dr Benjamin Tow
    Dr Kannan Kaliyaperumal Dr Yegappan Muthukaruppan Dr David Su Dr Andy Wee
    Dr Lai Choon Hin Dr Jack Pan Dr Ramesh Subramaniam Dr Francis Wong
    Dr Lai Kah Weng Dr Ravi Pillay Dr Tan Chong Tien Dr Yue Wai Mun

    Terms & Conditions:

    • Consultation is strictly by appointment only
    • Price is valid for first-time patients only, and not valid for walk-in patients
    • Price quoted includes the first consultation with the orthopaedic specialist and is inclusive of GST. It is exclusive of medications, clinical examinations and follow-up consultations
    • Valid only for participating orthopaedic specialists at Mount Elizabeth Hospital and Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital
    • Mount Elizabeth Hospital and Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital reserve the right to amend terms and conditions without prior notice
    • Mount Elizabeth Hospital and Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital will not accept any responsibility for claims, demands, losses, costs, expenses or liability of any kind whatsoever suffered arising from or relating to any transaction or dealing between the participating clinic and the customer
    • In the event of any dispute, the decision by Mount Elizabeth Hospital and Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital shall be final   

    By contacting us, you agree to the terms of use and Parkway's Personal Data Protection Policy and consent to the use of your personal data given above to process follow-up actions to provide a seamless patient experience, including but not limited to confirming my appointment etc.


  • Common Injuries by Sport

    athlete running

    Sports injuries are injuries that most commonly occur during sports or exercise. Sports injuries may result from accidents, overworking of muscles or joints, improper equipment, lack of conditioning or insufficient warm-up.

    What sports injury are you most likely to have? Find out what are some common injuries related to your sport that you should watch out for.

    What sport do you play?

    Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury

    knee injury

    The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the main stabilising ligaments in the knee. An anterior cruciate ligament injury is a tear to the anterior cruciate ligament. Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament are common among people who play sports that have start-stop movements, pivoting or sudden changes in direction. These sports include football, netball, tennis, dancing and skiing.

    The symptoms include a popping sound when the ligament ruptures, difficulty with knee movement, feeling of instability, with the knee ‘giving way’ during daily activities, pain immediately after an injury, swelling of the affected knee within 4 – 12 hours, or walking with a painful limp.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Foot Fracture

    young woman with fractured foot

    A fracture is a broken bone which occurs when the physical force exerted on the bone is stronger than the bone itself. Fractures may occur at any age. Certain conditions such as osteoporosis that commonly affect older people may lead to brittle bones, increasing the risk of bone fracture.

    Symptoms of bone fracture include pain, swelling, bruising, loss of function and bone deformity at the injured area.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Plantar Fasciitis

    plantar fasciitis

    Plantar fasciitis (pronounced fash-ee-eye-tus) is an inflammation of the band of muscle (called the plantar fascia) under the foot that supports the arch. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. It can occur in one or both feet.

    Plantar fasciitis is caused by strain to the plantar fascia muscle under the foot. The cause could be degenerative or it could be from a previous injury. It can occur if you wear poor footwear, for example shoes with thin soles or that are not supportive enough. Other causes include:

    • Going back to strenuous activity after a long period of rest
    • Having a short calf muscle
    • Having poor ankle range of motion

    Middle-aged people are most commonly affected.

    Common symptoms of plantar fasciitis include 'first step pain', which is pain that occurs when taking the first steps upon waking up in the morning, or swelling observed at the foot area.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Shin Splint

    Shin Splint

    A shin splint is an inflammation of the muscles, tendons and bone tissue around the inner edge of the leg bone (tibia). They are often associated with running or walking for prolonged periods of time. In general, shin splints develop when the muscle and bone tissue in the leg become overworked.

    Common symptoms of a shin splint include a sharp or dull and throbbing pain along the border of the tibia, swelling, pain which occurs both during and after exercise, and pain that aggravated upon touching the area.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Sprain

    Sprain

    A sprain happens as a result of stress to the ligaments or joints. It is one of the most common sports-related injuries. Besides playing sports, an awkward step, tripping over while walking or slipping on a wet surface may also cause this common injury.

    When an ankle is sprained, the ligaments, which are tissues that stabilise the joint, are partially or completely torn. Though these ligaments have the ability to heal well, there is a higher risk of repeated sprains in the future. One of the risk factors of a sprained ankle is having ankle instability. More severe cases require prolonged bracing and a possibility of surgery to repair ligaments.

    Prolonged pain from an ankle sprain should be evaluated by an orthopaedic specialist. MRI scans will be very useful to exclude an osteochondral injury.

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    wrist pain

    Carpal (wrist) tunnel is a tunnel in the wrist. Nine tendons and the median nerve pass through the tunnel. When pressure builds up in the tunnel, the nerve gets compressed and is unable to function properly. This may result in numbness, discomfort and pain in the fingers. Carpal tunnel syndrome may be caused by a previous wrist fracture that has caused narrowing of the carpal tunnel, inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and associated conditions such as diabetes mellitus or hormonal disorders.

    Symptoms usually include pain, numbness and tingling in the hand and fingers, and a weak grip while doing simple tasks such as holding the telephone or reading the newspaper.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

    hand injury

    De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is an inflammation of the tendon sheath at the base of the thumb. The tendons that move the thumb become constricted in a tight tunnel. The inflammation comes from the friction created as the tendon glides along the thumb with repeated movements. The usual cause of De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is overuse of the wrist. Nursing mothers are often affected during the time that they are caring for their infant.

    Common symptoms include pain over the wrist joint near the base of the thumb, pain after increased activity involving the wrist and hand, pain beginning as an aching sensation to a sharp pain, and swelling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Rotator Cuff Injury

    swelling of the shoulder

    The rotator cuff is the network of 4 muscles and several tendons that form a covering around the top of the upper arm bone. The rotator cuff holds the upper arm bone in place and enables the arm to rotate. rotator cuff injury and inflammation is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain.

    There are 3 common types rotator cuff injury:

    • Rotator cuff tendonitis
    • Rotator cuff impingement syndrome
    • Rotator cuff tear

    Rotator cuff tendonitis is caused by irritation and inflammation of the tendons of the rotator cuff muscles. This may be due to an injury or to overuse of the shoulder. It can occur in athletes who participate in throwing sports or in non-athletes with a history of recent heavy lifting or activities involving repetitive movements of the shoulder.

    Symptoms include generalised shoulder pain, or pain that worsens with overhead activities or at night.

    In rotator cuff impingement syndrome, the rotator cuff tendon becomes trapped and the tendon is repeatedly scraped against the shoulder blade, leading to fraying of the tendon. Symptoms include chronic pain that worsens at night or with overhead activities.

    Rotator cuff tears are tears in the rotator cuff tendon rather than in the muscles. Rotator cuff tears normally happen as a result of a fall or an accident in younger people. In older people, they are usually caused by rotator cuff impingement syndrome. Symptoms include pain and weakness.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Patellar Tendonitis (Jumper’s Knee)

    patellar tendon

    Patellar tendonitis is an injury to the tendon connecting your knee cap to your shin bone. The patellar tendon helps your muscles extend your lower leg so that you can kick a ball, pedal your bicycle and jump up in the air.

    Patellar tendonitis is usually caused by overuse of the patellar tendon. People who play sports with lots of squatting and jumping movements are most at risk. Another cause is abnormal alignment of the lower limbs, such as in flat feet. These altered postures change the angle between the quadriceps muscle and the patellar tendon. Increased tension in the patellar tendon may occur during growth spurts, such that the tendon cannot keep up with the growth of the lower leg. In this situation, the tendon becomes too short, causing it to pull on the bottom tip of the knee cap. This condition is known as Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disorder.

    Symptoms of patellar tendonitis include pain and tenderness just below the kneecap, swelling and pain when kneeling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Sprain

    Sprain

    A sprain happens as a result of stress to the ligaments or joints. It is one of the most common sports-related injuries. Besides playing sports, an awkward step, tripping over while walking or slipping on a wet surface may also cause this common injury.

    When an ankle is sprained, the ligaments, which are tissues that stabilise the joint, are partially or completely torn. Though these ligaments have the ability to heal well, there is a higher risk of repeated sprains in the future. One of the risk factors of a sprained ankle is having ankle instability. More severe cases require prolonged bracing and a possibility of surgery to repair ligaments.

    Prolonged pain from an ankle sprain should be evaluated by an orthopaedic specialist. MRI scans will be very useful to exclude an osteochondral injury.

    Tennis Elbow

    tennis elbow

    Tennis elbow is a common condition that is usually caused by excessive or repetitive turning or lifting of the elbow. The repetitive motion strains the muscles and tendons attached to the elbow, leading to tiny tears and inflammation near the bony lump (lateral epicondyle) on the outer part of the elbow.

    Common symptoms include pain on the outer part of the elbow, pain when bending or lifting the arm, writing or gripping objects, pain accompanied with stiffness upon full extension of the arm, tenderness or swelling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    wrist pain

    Carpal (wrist) tunnel is a tunnel in the wrist. Nine tendons and the median nerve pass through the tunnel. When pressure builds up in the tunnel, the nerve gets compressed and is unable to function properly. This may result in numbness, discomfort and pain in the fingers. Carpal tunnel syndrome may be caused by a previous wrist fracture that has caused narrowing of the carpal tunnel, inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and associated conditions such as diabetes mellitus or hormonal disorders.

    Symptoms usually include pain, numbness and tingling in the hand and fingers, and a weak grip while doing simple tasks such as holding the telephone or reading the newspaper.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

    hand injury

    De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is an inflammation of the tendon sheath at the base of the thumb. The tendons that move the thumb become constricted in a tight tunnel. The inflammation comes from the friction created as the tendon glides along the thumb with repeated movements. The usual cause of De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is overuse of the wrist. Nursing mothers are often affected during the time that they are caring for their infant.

    Common symptoms include pain over the wrist joint near the base of the thumb, pain after increased activity involving the wrist and hand, pain beginning as an aching sensation to a sharp pain, and swelling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Rotator Cuff Injury

    swelling of the shoulder

    The rotator cuff is the network of 4 muscles and several tendons that form a covering around the top of the upper arm bone. The rotator cuff holds the upper arm bone in place and enables the arm to rotate. rotator cuff injury and inflammation is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain.

    There are 3 common types rotator cuff injury:

    • Rotator cuff tendonitis
    • Rotator cuff impingement syndrome
    • Rotator cuff tear

    Rotator cuff tendonitis is caused by irritation and inflammation of the tendons of the rotator cuff muscles. This may be due to an injury or to overuse of the shoulder. It can occur in athletes who participate in throwing sports or in non-athletes with a history of recent heavy lifting or activities involving repetitive movements of the shoulder.

    Symptoms include generalised shoulder pain, or pain that worsens with overhead activities or at night.

    In rotator cuff impingement syndrome, the rotator cuff tendon becomes trapped and the tendon is repeatedly scraped against the shoulder blade, leading to fraying of the tendon. Symptoms include chronic pain that worsens at night or with overhead activities.

    Rotator cuff tears are tears in the rotator cuff tendon rather than in the muscles. Rotator cuff tears normally happen as a result of a fall or an accident in younger people. In older people, they are usually caused by rotator cuff impingement syndrome. Symptoms include pain and weakness.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Patellar Tendonitis (Jumper’s Knee)

    patellar tendon

    Patellar tendonitis is an injury to the tendon connecting your knee cap to your shin bone. The patellar tendon helps your muscles extend your lower leg so that you can kick a ball, pedal your bicycle and jump up in the air.

    Patellar tendonitis is usually caused by overuse of the patellar tendon. People who play sports with lots of squatting and jumping movements are most at risk. Another cause is abnormal alignment of the lower limbs, such as in flat feet. These altered postures change the angle between the quadriceps muscle and the patellar tendon. Increased tension in the patellar tendon may occur during growth spurts, such that the tendon cannot keep up with the growth of the lower leg. In this situation, the tendon becomes too short, causing it to pull on the bottom tip of the knee cap. This condition is known as Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disorder.

    Symptoms of patellar tendonitis include pain and tenderness just below the kneecap, swelling and pain when kneeling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Sprain

    Sprain

    A sprain happens as a result of stress to the ligaments or joints. It is one of the most common sports-related injuries. Besides playing sports, an awkward step, tripping over while walking or slipping on a wet surface may also cause this common injury.

    When an ankle is sprained, the ligaments, which are tissues that stabilise the joint, are partially or completely torn. Though these ligaments have the ability to heal well, there is a higher risk of repeated sprains in the future. One of the risk factors of a sprained ankle is having ankle instability. More severe cases require prolonged bracing and a possibility of surgery to repair ligaments.

    Prolonged pain from an ankle sprain should be evaluated by an orthopaedic specialist. MRI scans will be very useful to exclude an osteochondral injury.

    Tennis Elbow

    tennis elbow

    Tennis elbow is a common condition that is usually caused by excessive or repetitive turning or lifting of the elbow. The repetitive motion strains the muscles and tendons attached to the elbow, leading to tiny tears and inflammation near the bony lump (lateral epicondyle) on the outer part of the elbow.

    Common symptoms include pain on the outer part of the elbow, pain when bending or lifting the arm, writing or gripping objects, pain accompanied with stiffness upon full extension of the arm, tenderness or swelling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Achilles Tendonitis

    pain in the back of ankle

    The Achilles tendon is the large tendon in the back of the ankle that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone. These muscles are essential for walking, running and jumping. The Achilles tendon withstands a great deal of stress during normal daily life. Achilles tendonitis occurs when the muscles and tendon are overused, causing irritation and inflammation of the tendon.

    There are 2 types of Achilles tendonitis:

    • Insertional Achilles tendonitis, which affects the lower portion where the tendon attaches to the heel. This can occur at any age
    • Non-insertional Achilles tendonitis, which affects the middle part of the tendon and there is swelling and thickening in this area. This is most common among young active people

    Hardening (calcification) of the damaged tendon fibres can occur in both types of Achilles tendonitis. 

    Achilles tendonitis is often caused by continuous stress on the affected area, usually from repetitive movements during sports or recreational activities such as running, jumping, or even from a sudden change in intensity of an activity. Poor stretching or conditioning before exercise or playing sports also increases the risk. Other conditions such as tendonitis may also irritate the Achilles tendon. 

    Common symptoms of Achilles tendonitis include pain or swelling at the back of the heel, inability to bend the ankle, discomfort when walking, swelling of the calf, joint deformity, pain in the ankle area, as well as signs of infection such as fever, redness, or warmth.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Anterior Knee Pain (Runner’s Knee)

    runner with knee pain

    Anterior knee pain is the inflammation of the underside of the kneecap (patella). It often affects young people who play sports and older people who overwork their knees. Anterior knee pain can be due to injury or trauma to the kneecap (such as a dislocation or fracture), overuse with repetitive stress placed on your knee joint (prolonged long distance running or jumping sports), or when muscles around the hip and knee weaken.

    Common symptoms include a dull aching pain in the front of kneecap, which can be aggravated by kneeling, squatting, running, sitting and walking up and down the stairs.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury

    knee injury

    The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the main stabilising ligaments in the knee. An anterior cruciate ligament injury is a tear to the anterior cruciate ligament. Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament are common among people who play sports that have start-stop movements, pivoting or sudden changes in direction. These sports include football, netball, tennis, dancing and skiing.

    The symptoms include a popping sound when the ligament ruptures, difficulty with knee movement, feeling of instability, with the knee ‘giving way’ during daily activities, pain immediately after an injury, swelling of the affected knee within 4 – 12 hours, or walking with a painful limp.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Foot Fracture

    young woman with fractured foot

    A fracture is a broken bone which occurs when the physical force exerted on the bone is stronger than the bone itself. Fractures may occur at any age. Certain conditions such as osteoporosis that commonly affect older people may lead to brittle bones, increasing the risk of bone fracture.

    Symptoms of bone fracture include pain, swelling, bruising, loss of function and bone deformity at the injured area.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Meniscus Tear

    knee meniscus tear

    A meniscus tear occurs when one of the pieces of cartilage in the knee is injured and tears. The meniscus is a small C-shaped cartilage that acts as a cushion in the knee joint. A meniscus tear occurs during movements that forcefully rotate the knee while the foot is firmly planted, which may happen during contact sports such as basketball or football.

    Symptoms of a meniscus tear include clicking or popping sounds during movement, limited range of movement, a locking sensation (inability to straighten the knee), pain on either side of the knee, swelling at the joint line are or tenderness along the joint line.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Patellar Tendonitis (Jumper’s Knee)

    patellar tendon

    Patellar tendonitis is an injury to the tendon connecting your knee cap to your shin bone. The patellar tendon helps your muscles extend your lower leg so that you can kick a ball, pedal your bicycle and jump up in the air.

    Patellar tendonitis is usually caused by overuse of the patellar tendon. People who play sports with lots of squatting and jumping movements are most at risk. Another cause is abnormal alignment of the lower limbs, such as in flat feet. These altered postures change the angle between the quadriceps muscle and the patellar tendon. Increased tension in the patellar tendon may occur during growth spurts, such that the tendon cannot keep up with the growth of the lower leg. In this situation, the tendon becomes too short, causing it to pull on the bottom tip of the knee cap. This condition is known as Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disorder.

    Symptoms of patellar tendonitis include pain and tenderness just below the kneecap, swelling and pain when kneeling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Sprain

    Sprain

    A sprain happens as a result of stress to the ligaments or joints. It is one of the most common sports-related injuries. Besides playing sports, an awkward step, tripping over while walking or slipping on a wet surface may also cause this common injury.

    When an ankle is sprained, the ligaments, which are tissues that stabilise the joint, are partially or completely torn. Though these ligaments have the ability to heal well, there is a higher risk of repeated sprains in the future. One of the risk factors of a sprained ankle is having ankle instability. More severe cases require prolonged bracing and a possibility of surgery to repair ligaments.

    Prolonged pain from an ankle sprain should be evaluated by an orthopaedic specialist. MRI scans will be very useful to exclude an osteochondral injury.

    Achilles Tendonitis

    pain in the back of ankle

    The Achilles tendon is the large tendon in the back of the ankle that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone. These muscles are essential for walking, running and jumping. The Achilles tendon withstands a great deal of stress during normal daily life. Achilles tendonitis occurs when the muscles and tendon are overused, causing irritation and inflammation of the tendon.

    There are 2 types of Achilles tendonitis:

    • Insertional Achilles tendonitis, which affects the lower portion where the tendon attaches to the heel. This can occur at any age
    • Non-insertional Achilles tendonitis, which affects the middle part of the tendon and there is swelling and thickening in this area. This is most common among young active people

    Hardening (calcification) of the damaged tendon fibres can occur in both types of Achilles tendonitis. 

    Achilles tendonitis is often caused by continuous stress on the affected area, usually from repetitive movements during sports or recreational activities such as running, jumping, or even from a sudden change in intensity of an activity. Poor stretching or conditioning before exercise or playing sports also increases the risk. Other conditions such as tendonitis may also irritate the Achilles tendon. 

    Common symptoms of Achilles tendonitis include pain or swelling at the back of the heel, inability to bend the ankle, discomfort when walking, swelling of the calf, joint deformity, pain in the ankle area, as well as signs of infection such as fever, redness, or warmth.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Anterior Knee Pain (Runner’s Knee)

    runner with knee pain

    Anterior knee pain is the inflammation of the underside of the kneecap (patella). It often affects young people who play sports and older people who overwork their knees. Anterior knee pain can be due to injury or trauma to the kneecap (such as a dislocation or fracture), overuse with repetitive stress placed on your knee joint (prolonged long distance running or jumping sports), or when muscles around the hip and knee weaken.

    Common symptoms include a dull aching pain in the front of kneecap, which can be aggravated by kneeling, squatting, running, sitting and walking up and down the stairs.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Shin Splint

    Shin Splint

    A shin splint is an inflammation of the muscles, tendons and bone tissue around the inner edge of the leg bone (tibia). They are often associated with running or walking for prolonged periods of time. In general, shin splints develop when the muscle and bone tissue in the leg become overworked.

    Common symptoms of a shin splint include a sharp or dull and throbbing pain along the border of the tibia, swelling, pain which occurs both during and after exercise, and pain that aggravated upon touching the area.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Plantar Fasciitis

    plantar fasciitis

    Plantar fasciitis (pronounced fash-ee-eye-tus) is an inflammation of the band of muscle (called the plantar fascia) under the foot that supports the arch. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. It can occur in one or both feet.

    Plantar fasciitis is caused by strain to the Plantar Fascia muscle under the foot. The cause could be degenerative or it could be from a previous injury. It can occur if you wear poor footwear, for example shoes with thin soles or that are not supportive enough. Other causes include:

    • Going back to strenuous activity after a long period of rest
    • Having a short calf muscle
    • Having poor ankle range of motion

    Middle-aged people are most commonly affected.

    Common symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis include 'first step pain', which is pain that occurs when taking the first steps upon waking up in the morning, or swelling observed at the foot area.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Sprain

    Sprain

    A sprain happens as a result of stress to the ligaments or joints. It is one of the most common sports-related injuries. Besides playing sports, an awkward step, tripping over while walking or slipping on a wet surface may also cause this common injury.

    When an ankle is sprained, the ligaments, which are tissues that stabilise the joint, are partially or completely torn. Though these ligaments have the ability to heal well, there is a higher risk of repeated sprains in the future. One of the risk factors of a sprained ankle is having ankle instability. More severe cases require prolonged bracing and a possibility of surgery to repair ligaments.

    Prolonged pain from an ankle sprain should be evaluated by an orthopaedic specialist. MRI scans will be very useful to exclude an osteochondral injury.

    Anterior Knee Pain (Runner’s Knee)

    runner with knee pain

    Anterior knee pain is the inflammation of the underside of the kneecap (patella). It often affects young people who play sports and older people who overwork their knees. Anterior knee pain can be due to injury or trauma to the kneecap (such as a dislocation or fracture), overuse with repetitive stress placed on your knee joint (prolonged long distance running or jumping sports), or when muscles around the hip and knee weaken.

    Common symptoms include a dull aching pain in the front of kneecap, which can be aggravated by kneeling, squatting, running, sitting and walking up and down the stairs.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury

    knee injury

    The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the main stabilising ligaments in the knee. An anterior cruciate ligament injury is a tear to the anterior cruciate ligament. Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament are common among people who play sports that have start-stop movements, pivoting or sudden changes in direction. These sports include football, netball, tennis, dancing and skiing.

    The symptoms include a popping sound when the ligament ruptures, difficulty with knee movement, feeling of instability, with the knee ‘giving way’ during daily activities, pain immediately after an injury, swelling of the affected knee within 4 – 12 hours, or walking with a painful limp.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    wrist pain

    Carpal (wrist) tunnel is a tunnel in the wrist. Nine tendons and the median nerve pass through the tunnel. When pressure builds up in the tunnel, the nerve gets compressed and is unable to function properly. This may result in numbness, discomfort and pain in the fingers. Carpal tunnel syndrome may be caused by a previous wrist fracture that has caused narrowing of the carpal tunnel, inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and associated conditions such as diabetes mellitus or hormonal disorders.

    Symptoms usually include pain, numbness and tingling in the hand and fingers, and a weak grip while doing simple tasks such as holding the telephone or reading the newspaper.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

    hand injury

    De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is an inflammation of the tendon sheath at the base of the thumb. The tendons that move the thumb become constricted in a tight tunnel. The inflammation comes from the friction created as the tendon glides along the thumb with repeated movements. The usual cause of De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is overuse of the wrist. Nursing mothers are often affected during the time that they are caring for their infant.

    Common symptoms include pain over the wrist joint near the base of the thumb, pain after increased activity involving the wrist and hand, pain beginning as an aching sensation to a sharp pain, and swelling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Lower Back Pain

    hand injury

    Lower back pain is one of the most common conditions related to spine health. It commonly results from gradual injury to the lower back muscles due to poor posture, inappropriate lifting techniques or chronic overuse. Everyday activities may over time also lead to micro trauma in the spine and hinder smooth movement and function. As a result, there is pain, movement limitation and degeneration.

     

    Signs and symptoms include pain in the back, referred pain or altered sensation in the feet, pain upon weight bearing, pain during coughing or sneezing, muscle spasms, and limitation in movement. Treatment varies depending on the clinical condition and severity of the injury.

     

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Rotator Cuff Injury

    swelling of the shoulder

    The rotator cuff is the network of 4 muscles and several tendons that form a covering around the top of the upper arm bone. The rotator cuff holds the upper arm bone in place and enables the arm to rotate. rotator cuff injury and inflammation is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain.

    There are 3 common types rotator cuff injury:

    • Rotator cuff tendonitis
    • Rotator cuff impingement syndrome
    • Rotator cuff tear

    Rotator cuff tendonitis is caused by irritation and inflammation of the tendons of the rotator cuff muscles. This may be due to an injury or to overuse of the shoulder. It can occur in athletes who participate in throwing sports or in non-athletes with a history of recent heavy lifting or activities involving repetitive movements of the shoulder.

    Symptoms include generalised shoulder pain, or pain that worsens with overhead activities or at night.

    In rotator cuff impingement syndrome, the rotator cuff tendon becomes trapped and the tendon is repeatedly scraped against the shoulder blade, leading to fraying of the tendon. Symptoms include chronic pain that worsens at night or with overhead activities.

    Rotator cuff tears are tears in the rotator cuff tendon rather than in the muscles. Rotator cuff tears normally happen as a result of a fall or an accident in younger people. In older people, they are usually caused by rotator cuff impingement syndrome. Symptoms include pain and weakness.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Tennis Elbow

    tennis elbow

    Tennis elbow is a common condition that is usually caused by excessive or repetitive turning or lifting of the elbow. The repetitive motion strains the muscles and tendons attached to the elbow, leading to tiny tears and inflammation near the bony lump (lateral epicondyle) on the outer part of the elbow.

    Common symptoms include pain on the outer part of the elbow, pain when bending or lifting the arm, writing or gripping objects, pain accompanied with stiffness upon full extension of the arm, tenderness or swelling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Sprain

    Sprain

    A sprain happens as a result of stress to the ligaments or joints. It is one of the most common sports-related injuries. Besides playing sports, an awkward step, tripping over while walking or slipping on a wet surface may also cause this common injury.

    When an ankle is sprained, the ligaments, which are tissues that stabilise the joint, are partially or completely torn. Though these ligaments have the ability to heal well, there is a higher risk of repeated sprains in the future. One of the risk factors of a sprained ankle is having ankle instability. More severe cases require prolonged bracing and a possibility of surgery to repair ligaments.

    Prolonged pain from an ankle sprain should be evaluated by an orthopaedic specialist. MRI scans will be very useful to exclude an osteochondral injury.

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    wrist pain

    Carpal (wrist) tunnel is a tunnel in the wrist. Nine tendons and the median nerve pass through the tunnel. When pressure builds up in the tunnel, the nerve gets compressed and is unable to function properly. This may result in numbness, discomfort and pain in the fingers. Carpal tunnel syndrome may be caused by a previous wrist fracture that has caused narrowing of the carpal tunnel, inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and associated conditions such as diabetes mellitus or hormonal disorders.

    Symptoms usually include pain, numbness and tingling in the hand and fingers, and a weak grip while doing simple tasks such as holding the telephone or reading the newspaper.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

    hand injury

    De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is an inflammation of the tendon sheath at the base of the thumb. The tendons that move the thumb become constricted in a tight tunnel. The inflammation comes from the friction created as the tendon glides along the thumb with repeated movements. The usual cause of De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is overuse of the wrist. Nursing mothers are often affected during the time that they are caring for their infant.

    Common symptoms include pain over the wrist joint near the base of the thumb, pain after increased activity involving the wrist and hand, pain beginning as an aching sensation to a sharp pain, and swelling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Patellar Tendonitis (Jumper’s Knee)

    patellar tendon

    Patellar tendonitis is an injury to the tendon connecting your knee cap to your shin bone. The patellar tendon helps your muscles extend your lower leg so that you can kick a ball, pedal your bicycle and jump up in the air.

    Patellar tendonitis is usually caused by overuse of the patellar tendon. People who play sports with lots of squatting and jumping movements are most at risk. Another cause is abnormal alignment of the lower limbs, such as in flat feet. These altered postures change the angle between the quadriceps muscle and the patellar tendon. Increased tension in the patellar tendon may occur during growth spurts, such that the tendon cannot keep up with the growth of the lower leg. In this situation, the tendon becomes too short, causing it to pull on the bottom tip of the knee cap. This condition is known as Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disorder.

    Symptoms of patellar tendonitis include pain and tenderness just below the kneecap, swelling and pain when kneeling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Tennis Elbow

    tennis elbow

    Tennis elbow is a common condition that is usually caused by excessive or repetitive turning or lifting of the elbow. The repetitive motion strains the muscles and tendons attached to the elbow, leading to tiny tears and inflammation near the bony lump (lateral epicondyle) on the outer part of the elbow.

    Common symptoms include pain on the outer part of the elbow, pain when bending or lifting the arm, writing or gripping objects, pain accompanied with stiffness upon full extension of the arm, tenderness or swelling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Rotator Cuff Injury

    swelling of the shoulder

    The rotator cuff is the network of 4 muscles and several tendons that form a covering around the top of the upper arm bone. The rotator cuff holds the upper arm bone in place and enables the arm to rotate. rotator cuff injury and inflammation is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain.

    There are 3 common types rotator cuff injury:

    • Rotator cuff tendonitis
    • Rotator cuff impingement syndrome
    • Rotator cuff tear

    Rotator cuff tendonitis is caused by irritation and inflammation of the tendons of the rotator cuff muscles. This may be due to an injury or to overuse of the shoulder. It can occur in athletes who participate in throwing sports or in non-athletes with a history of recent heavy lifting or activities involving repetitive movements of the shoulder.

    Symptoms include generalised shoulder pain, or pain that worsens with overhead activities or at night.

    In rotator cuff impingement syndrome, the rotator cuff tendon becomes trapped and the tendon is repeatedly scraped against the shoulder blade, leading to fraying of the tendon. Symptoms include chronic pain that worsens at night or with overhead activities.

    Rotator cuff tears are tears in the rotator cuff tendon rather than in the muscles. Rotator cuff tears normally happen as a result of a fall or an accident in younger people. In older people, they are usually caused by rotator cuff impingement syndrome. Symptoms include pain and weakness.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Lower Back Pain

    hand injury

    Lower back pain is one of the most common conditions related to spine health. It commonly results from gradual injury to the lower back muscles due to poor posture, inappropriate lifting techniques or chronic overuse. Everyday activities may over time also lead to micro trauma in the spine and hinder smooth movement and function. As a result, there is pain, movement limitation and degeneration.

     

    Signs and symptoms include pain in the back, referred pain or altered sensation in the feet, pain upon weight bearing, pain during coughing or sneezing, muscle spasms, and limitation in movement. Treatment varies depending on the clinical condition and severity of the injury.

     

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

    hand injury

    De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is an inflammation of the tendon sheath at the base of the thumb. The tendons that move the thumb become constricted in a tight tunnel. The inflammation comes from the friction created as the tendon glides along the thumb with repeated movements. The usual cause of De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is overuse of the wrist. Nursing mothers are often affected during the time that they are caring for their infant.

    Common symptoms include pain over the wrist joint near the base of the thumb, pain after increased activity involving the wrist and hand, pain beginning as an aching sensation to a sharp pain, and swelling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    wrist pain

    Carpal (wrist) tunnel is a tunnel in the wrist. Nine tendons and the median nerve pass through the tunnel. When pressure builds up in the tunnel, the nerve gets compressed and is unable to function properly. This may result in numbness, discomfort and pain in the fingers. Carpal tunnel syndrome may be caused by a previous wrist fracture that has caused narrowing of the carpal tunnel, inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and associated conditions such as diabetes mellitus or hormonal disorders.

    Symptoms usually include pain, numbness and tingling in the hand and fingers, and a weak grip while doing simple tasks such as holding the telephone or reading the newspaper.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Rotator Cuff Injury

    swelling of the shoulder

    The rotator cuff is the network of 4 muscles and several tendons that form a covering around the top of the upper arm bone. The rotator cuff holds the upper arm bone in place and enables the arm to rotate. rotator cuff injury and inflammation is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain.

    There are 3 common types rotator cuff injury:

    • Rotator cuff tendonitis
    • Rotator cuff impingement syndrome
    • Rotator cuff tear

    Rotator cuff tendonitis is caused by irritation and inflammation of the tendons of the rotator cuff muscles. This may be due to an injury or to overuse of the shoulder. It can occur in athletes who participate in throwing sports or in non-athletes with a history of recent heavy lifting or activities involving repetitive movements of the shoulder.

    Symptoms include generalised shoulder pain, or pain that worsens with overhead activities or at night.

    In rotator cuff impingement syndrome, the rotator cuff tendon becomes trapped and the tendon is repeatedly scraped against the shoulder blade, leading to fraying of the tendon. Symptoms include chronic pain that worsens at night or with overhead activities.

    Rotator cuff tears are tears in the rotator cuff tendon rather than in the muscles. Rotator cuff tears normally happen as a result of a fall or an accident in younger people. In older people, they are usually caused by rotator cuff impingement syndrome. Symptoms include pain and weakness.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injury

    knee injury

    The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the main stabilising ligaments in the knee. An anterior cruciate ligament injury is a tear to the anterior cruciate ligament. Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament are common among people who play sports that have start-stop movements, pivoting or sudden changes in direction. These sports include football, netball, tennis, dancing and skiing.

    The symptoms include a popping sound when the ligament ruptures, difficulty with knee movement, feeling of instability, with the knee ‘giving way’ during daily activities, pain immediately after an injury, swelling of the affected knee within 4 – 12 hours, or walking with a painful limp.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Dislocation

    man with shoulder injury

    Shoulder dislocation occurs when the upper arm bone pops out of the socket that is part of the shoulder blade. Dislocation is a painful and traumatic injury that is often caused by a fall or during contact sports.

    Symptoms include swelling or bruising, intense pain, a visibly out-of-place shoulder, a numbing sensation along the neck area, and being unable to move the shoulder joint.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Foot Fracture

    young woman with fractured foot

    A fracture is a broken bone which occurs when the physical force exerted on the bone is stronger than the bone itself. Fractures may occur at any age. Certain conditions such as osteoporosis that commonly affect older people may lead to brittle bones, increasing the risk of bone fracture.

    Symptoms of bone fracture include pain, swelling, bruising, loss of function and bone deformity at the injured area.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Meniscus Tear

    knee meniscus tear

    A meniscus tear occurs when one of the pieces of cartilage in the knee is injured and tears. The meniscus is a small C-shaped cartilage that acts as a cushion in the knee joint. A meniscus tear occurs during movements that forcefully rotate the knee while the foot is firmly planted, which may happen during contact sports such as basketball or football.

    Symptoms of a meniscus tear include clicking or popping sounds during movement, limited range of movement, a locking sensation (inability to straighten the knee), pain on either side of the knee, swelling at the joint line are or tenderness along the joint line.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Patellar Tendonitis (Jumper’s Knee)

    patellar tendon

    Patellar tendonitis is an injury to the tendon connecting your knee cap to your shin bone. The patellar tendon helps your muscles extend your lower leg so that you can kick a ball, pedal your bicycle and jump up in the air.

    Patellar tendonitis is usually caused by overuse of the patellar tendon. People who play sports with lots of squatting and jumping movements are most at risk. Another cause is abnormal alignment of the lower limbs, such as in flat feet. These altered postures change the angle between the quadriceps muscle and the patellar tendon. Increased tension in the patellar tendon may occur during growth spurts, such that the tendon cannot keep up with the growth of the lower leg. In this situation, the tendon becomes too short, causing it to pull on the bottom tip of the knee cap. This condition is known as Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disorder.

    Symptoms of patellar tendonitis include pain and tenderness just below the kneecap, swelling and pain when kneeling.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Shin Splint

    Shin Splint

    A shin splint is an inflammation of the muscles, tendons and bone tissue around the inner edge of the leg bone (tibia). They are often associated with running or walking for prolonged periods of time. In general, shin splints develop when the muscle and bone tissue in the leg become overworked.

    Common symptoms of a shin splint include a sharp or dull and throbbing pain along the border of the tibia, swelling, pain which occurs both during and after exercise, and pain that aggravated upon touching the area.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Plantar Fasciitis

    plantar fasciitis

    Plantar fasciitis (pronounced fash-ee-eye-tus) is an inflammation of the band of muscle (called the plantar fascia) under the foot that supports the arch. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. It can occur in one or both feet.

    Plantar fasciitis is caused by strain to the Plantar Fascia muscle under the foot. The cause could be degenerative or it could be from a previous injury. It can occur if you wear poor footwear, for example shoes with thin soles or that are not supportive enough. Other causes include:

    • Going back to strenuous activity after a long period of rest
    • Having a short calf muscle
    • Having poor ankle range of motion

    Middle-aged people are most commonly affected.

    Common symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis include 'first step pain', which is pain that occurs when taking the first steps upon waking up in the morning, or swelling observed at the foot area.

    If you experience any of these symptoms, consult your orthopaedic specialist. Your doctor will recommend treatment options that best suit your lifestyle needs. Find out more about the treatment options and sports rehabilitation services available.

    Sprain

    Sprain

    A sprain happens as a result of stress to the ligaments or joints. It is one of the most common sports-related injuries. Besides playing sports, an awkward step, tripping over while walking or slipping on a wet surface may also cause this common injury.

    When an ankle is sprained, the ligaments, which are tissues that stabilise the joint, are partially or completely torn. Though these ligaments have the ability to heal well, there is a higher risk of repeated sprains in the future. One of the risk factors of a sprained ankle is having ankle instability. More severe cases require prolonged bracing and a possibility of surgery to repair ligaments.

    Prolonged pain from an ankle sprain should be evaluated by an orthopaedic specialist. MRI scans will be very useful to exclude an osteochondral injury.

  • Top Sports Injuries

    Back & Spine

    The spine is vital for the body’s structure and physical function. Any injury to the spine could lead to severe consequences. Find out what common back injuries could be causing your symptoms.

    Foot

    Foot and ankle injuries are common, especially among athletes. In certain cases, surgical intervention may be required to prevent long-term consequences. Find out what common foot injuries could be causing your symptoms.

    Hand

    Common causes of hand injuries include impact during sports, ageing wear and tear and accidental falls. Certain injuries may lead to serious conditions that can affect hand function in the long run. Find out what common hand injuries could be causing your symptoms.

    Knee

    Knee injuries can be caused by sports or recreational activities, accidental falls and ageing wear and tear. Certain knee injuries may lead to long term consequences if not treated promptly. Find out what common knee injuries could be causing your symptoms.

    Shoulder

    Shoulder injuries are commonly sustained during sports activities that require repetitive and excessive overhead motion such as tennis, badminton, swimming and weightlifting. Find out what common shoulder injuries could be causing your symptoms.

  • Sports Rehabilitation

    Physiotherapist monitors patient on treadmill

    Rehabilitation is often recommended for patients with sports injuries. At Mount Elizabeth Hospitals, we provide rehabilitation services such as physiotherapy, gait analysis, post-operation rehabilitation, prosthetics and orthotics, for people of all ages. With customised one-to-one guidance and exercise prescription, our focus is to help improve our patients’ functional limitations and to enhance recovery.

    Find out more about our rehabilitation services. For appointments and enquiries, please call the Mount Elizabeth Rehabilitation Centre at 6307 7950 or 63077951.

  • Managing Treatment Costs

    managing treatment costs

    We understand that treatment costs may be daunting at times. At Mount Elizabeth Hospitals, we accept bill financing from both local and international private hospitalisation insurance and Medisave-approved insurance known as ‘Integrated Shield Plans’. If you have an Integrated Shield Plan, you may not have to incur any out-of-pocket expenses for your hospital stay.

    Find out more about managing treatment costs, or contact us at 6653 7111 to find out if your Integrated Shield Plan covers you or your loved ones for Mount Elizabeth Hospitals.

  • It’s Possible at Mount Elizabeth Hospitals

    mount elizabeth novena hospital

    At Mount Elizabeth Orchard and Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospitals, we are committed to helping you achieve your goal of getting swift, accurate and effective treatment. Our multidisciplinary team of orthopaedic surgeons, nurses, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists will guide you through the entire treatment and recovery process with care and professionalism.

    Patients can benefit from Mount Elizabeth Hospitals’ advanced equipment and facilities. Our minimally invasive techniques reduce trauma and scarring while improving success rates. Computer-aided robotic surgery such as the MAKOplasty procedure allows for added precision during surgical procedures.

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