We create new possibilities for life We create new possibilities for life

WhatsApp Appointment

Orchard +65 8111 7777

Novena +65 8111 5777

  • Mount Elizabeth

Heart & Vascular (Cardiovascular)

  • Introduction

    Heart & Vascular (Cardiovascular), Mount Elizabeth

    The heart and vascular system, or cardiovascular system, is made up of the heart, which functions as a pump, and the blood vessels (arteries, veins and capillaries) that supply blood to the entire body.

    Cardiovascular disease is a general term referring to conditions that affect the heart and blood vessels and cardiology is the medical speciality that treats these diseases.

    It is a complex field that needs a range of preventive care, screening, advanced diagnostic tests, invasive and non-invasive procedures, post-operative management, cardiac rehabilitation, and a full range of surgical programmes, post-operative management, cardiac rehabilitation, and a full range of surgical programmes.

    Mount Elizabeth Hospitals’ cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons are armed with experience and skills, and supported by a team providing strong nursing care.

    Advanced cardiovascular surgical procedures

    At Mount Elizabeth Hospitals, we are committed to providing the most appropriate course of treatment for each patient’s cardiovascular condition and ensuring their well-being.

    Our facilities are equipped with innovative technology, enabling us to offer our heart patients quality treatment from our specialists. This includes advanced cardiovascular surgical procedures such as:

    • Carotid Ultrasound

      Carotid Ultrasound

      A carotid ultrasound is a safe and painless procedure that uses soundwaves to help find out if there is reduced blood supply to the brain.

    • Electrophysiology Study

      Electrophysiology Study

      Electrophysiology study (EPS) and catheter ablation procedure is performed to evaluate and treat abnormal heart rhythms. These includes atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), and frequent premature ventricular contractions.

    • Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD)

      Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD)

      An LVAD is also known as a mechanical circulatory support device. It is an implantable mechanical pump that helps to pump blood from a weakened heart to the rest of the body. It is commonly used in patients with severe heart failure.

    • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI)

      TAVI is a minimally invasive treatment option for severe aortic valve stenosis without removing the old, damaged valve. This technique does not need the heart to be stopped or for a large incision to be made.

    • Robotic (Computer-Aided) Surgery

      Robotic (computer-aided) surgery allows doctors to perform complex procedures with greater precision and flexibility. This usually involves a camera for high-definition view of the surgical site, and robotic arms that are controlled using via a computer console.

    • Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG)

      Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is a surgical procedure done to treat coronary artery disease. It helps to create a new passage for oxygen-rich blood to bypass blocked coronary arteries to improve blood flow to the heart muscle.

  • Some of the cardiovascular conditions we treat at Mount Elizabeth Hospitals include:

    • Aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection
      These conditions are commonly associated with uncontrolled high blood pressure. An aortic aneurism is the abnormal dilation of the aorta, which can cause the aorta to rupture and lead to significant internal bleeding and severe pain. An aortic dissection allows blood to flow between the layers in the wall of the aorta, which can lead to rapid blood loss. It is considered a medical emergency.
    • Carotid artery disease
      The carotid arteries, which deliver blood to the brain and head, can be affected when plaque develops inside the arteries. Carotid artery disease gradually decreases blood supply to the head and, if allowed to progress, can block blood supply and lead to a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Carotid artery disease is estimated to be responsible for 20 – 30% of all strokes.
    • Congenital heart disease
      Congenital heart disease refers to heart defects that exist from birth. They range from mild to severe and life-threatening conditions, such as atrial septal defect, hole in the heart, pulmonary/aortic stenosis, and more. As a result, treatment options and surgical procedures to treat congenital heart diseases vary widely, based on the specific condition.
    • Coronary artery disease
      Coronary artery disease occurs when fatty deposits build up in the coronary arteries. These deposits, known as plaque, narrow or obstruct the arteries that supply blood to the heart. Symptoms include chest pain during exertion or stress (angina) and shortness of breath, and it can also lead to heart attack and heart failure.
    • Heart arrhythmia
      Heart arrhythmia refers to an irregular heart rhythm. There are several types of heart arrhythmia in which the heart may beat too quickly, too slowly or erratically. This can affect blood flow and blood pressure, with consequences that vary. Some are mild and manageable while others may be life-threatening, leading to stroke and heart failure.
    • Heart attack
      A heart attack occurs when blood flow to the heart is reduced or blocked. This is usually caused by the build-up of fatty deposits or plaque in the arteries, resulting in narrowed arteries. This in turn affects oxygen supply to the heart muscles, which can be damaged if blood flow is not restored quickly.
    • Heart failure
      Heart failure occurs when the heart is unable to fulfil its primary function of pumping blood to the rest of the body. This deprives important organs and muscles of oxygen, with serious consequences such as breathlessness from the build-up of fluid in the lungs (oedema), chest pain (angina), fainting and sudden death.
    • Peripheral arterial disease
      Peripheral arterial disease (also called peripheral artery disease) refers to narrowed arteries that result in reduced blood flow to the arms and legs. The most common symptoms occur in the legs, which include cramping, numbness or weakness and slow-healing sores, among others. Both PAD and coronary artery disease are caused by atherosclerosis (narrowing of the arteries caused by a build-up of plaque).
    • Pleural effusion (fluid around lungs)
      Pleural effusion is the build-up of fluid between the pleura (thin membranes lining the lungs and the inside of the chest cavity). It can be caused by viral infection, pneumonia or heart failure, leading to chest pain, dry cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, or being able to breathe only when sitting or standing upright.
    • Pregnancy related cardiac conditions
      During pregnancy, blood volume increases, and the heart rate also increases in order to pump more blood to nourish the baby. The stress of labour also causes changes in blood flow and pressure. As a result, pregnancy-related cardiac conditions can cause problems with heart rhythm and heart valve function, and worsen existing heart problems.
    • Pulmonary arterial hypertension
      Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a condition where the small arteries in the lungs become narrow or blocked. This makes it harder for blood to flow through them, causing blood pressure in the lungs to increase. The heart also needs to pump harder, which can lead to weakened heart muscles and heart failure.
    • Valvular heart disease
      The heart valves control the flow of blood in the heart. With valvular heart disease, one or more of the four heart valves (mitral, aortic, tricuspid and pulmonary) are unable to function properly, resulting in backflow or restricted blood flow. This can lead to symptoms such as fainting, fatigue, irregular heartbeat and shortness of breath.

     

    *This is not a complete list of all the conditions that are recognised and treated at Mount Elizabeth Hospitals. The information provided is for educational reference only and should not be seen as medical advice.

    Please consult our qualified healthcare specialists for an accurate diagnosis before starting any treatment.

    Make an Enquiry Find a Doctor

  • At Mount Elizabeth Hospitals, we offer a range of cardiovascular screening, diagnostic tests and surgical procedures.

    Cardiac Diagnostics

    Screening

    • Electrocardiogram (ECG)
      An ECG is a quick, safe and pain-free way to detect and record the heart’s electrical activity. This reveals its rhythm and rate, helping doctors to uncover signs of heart diseases such as irregular heartbeat or blood flow, or if part of the heart is enlarged. It also helps doctors to check if the heart is functioning properly after heart surgery.
    • Trans-thoracic echocardiogram (TTE)
      This test uses high-frequency ultrasound waves to record images of the heart and its structures, allowing doctors to view the heart while it’s beating. With a TTE, doctors can review the heart chambers and valves, and how well the heart is pumping. It also reveals any abnormalities including the presence of tumours, clots, fluid around the heart, hole in the heart, heart murmur and many other potential problems.
    • Chest X-ray
      A chest X-ray is used to take images of the heart, lungs, blood vessels and surrounding structures, including the chest bone and spine. It is often one of the first diagnostic tests doctors recommend and can reveal abnormalities such as an enlarged heart, distorted artery or other possible problems affecting the heart.
    • Cardiac calcium scoring
      Cardiac calcium scoring is a test that measures the amount of calcium in the walls of coronary arteries, as the build-up of plaque (atherosclerosis) consists of fat, cholesterol and calcium. A high coronary calcium score may indicate a higher risk for heart attack. It is an effective screening test, performed before obvious symptoms of heart disease are present.

    Non-Invasive Diagnostics

    • Stress test
      A stress test may be done to reveal symptoms of coronary artery disease, as these may be more apparent or only appear when the heart is stressed. An ECG is taken while at rest, and another during exercise. Reduced heart activity and blood flow during a stress test may indicate one or more blocked arteries.
    • Holter monitoring
      The Holter is a portable device, worn for 24 or 48 hours to continuously monitor the heart’s electrical activity. With Holter monitoring, the device is worn through the day, to help detect problems like palpitations, fainting or dizziness that may point towards irregularities in heartbeat. It may reveal more than an electrocardiogram (ECG) that monitors heart activity for short periods.
    • Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring
      Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring test tracks blood pressure and heart rate at set intervals over a period of 24 hours, recording fluctuations in blood pressure during different activities and situations. It offers doctors a more detailed analysis of blood pressure, in order to manage hypertension more effectively, or to determine the cause of symptoms such as palpitations, giddiness or rapid heartbeat, among others.
    • Nuclear perfusion scan
      A nuclear perfusion scan may be recommended for patients who experience unexplained chest pains, or chest pain during exercise. It involves a radioactive compound injected into the veins, which allows doctors to view blood flow to the heart muscles. The captured images can reveal if parts of the heart are not receiving adequate blood supply, or the extent of damage following a heart attack, heart bypass surgery or angioplasty.

    Invasive Diagnostics

    • Coronary angiogram
      A coronary angiogram is an accurate way to detect any narrowing or blockage in the coronary arteries. Using a dye injected into a large artery, it enables doctors to visualise the coronary arteries that supply blood to the heart. It may be recommended prior to a coronary angioplasty or after a coronary artery bypass surgery (also known as open heart surgery).
    • Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)
      Also known as percutaneous coronary intervention or balloon angioplasty, PTCA helps to reopen narrowed or blocked arteries caused by the build-up of fatty deposits known as plaque. It is normally followed by a stent to keep the artery from narrowing after the balloon is removed. This helps to restore blood flow to the heart.
    • Transoesophageal echocardiogram (TEE)
      In a TEE, a long, thin flexible tube is inserted via the mouth and down into the oesophagus to create echocardiographic images. These provide doctors a view of the heart valves and chambers, to help in the evaluation of stroke or transient ischemic attacks (mini strokes) caused by blood clots in the heart, tumours or abnormal masses, or to assess conditions such as congenital heart diseases.
    • Electrophysiological study
      An electrophysiological study involves electrodes inserted into the heart, to record the heart’s electrical activity and map out its pathways to reveal the cause and location of abnormalities such as arrhythmias. This allows the doctor to determine if a pacemaker is needed to increase or decrease the heartbeat.
    • Pacemaker implantation
      A pacemaker is used to help regulate a slow heartbeat, which means it is unable to pump sufficient blood to the body. This is usually caused by problems with the heart’s electrical system. Pacemaker implantation helps to prevent the heart from slowing to the point where it may be dangerous, relieving symptoms such as fatigue, dizziness, fainting, and chest pain.
    • Defibrillator (AICD) implantation
      Defibrillator implantation connects a battery-powered device to the heart. It is used to monitor the heart rate for abnormal rhythm and delivers a small electrical charge to restore a normal heartbeat. This helps to prevent sudden death in patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation or to prevent cardiac arrest in patients at high risk for ventricular arrhythmias.

    Cardiothoracic Surgery

    • Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG)
      CABG is normally performed in cases of severe coronary heart disease to bypass blocked coronary arteries. Using blood vessels from another part of the body, the surgeon creates a new pathway that enables oxygen-rich blood to flow to the heart, relieving symptoms such as chest pain and reducing the risk of heart attack.
    • Heart valve repair/replacement surgery
      The heart’s four valves are responsible for controlling blood flow between different parts of the heart. Damaged or malfunctioning valves need repair or replacement or this may lead to insufficient blood flow to the heart or result in heart failure. Heart valve repair or replacement surgery can help reduce the risk of stroke and preserve heart function.
    • Paediatric/congenital heart repair surgery
      Paediatric / congenital heart repair is done to correct or repair heart defects that are present from birth. Paediatric heart surgery may be performed to treat a variety of congenital conditions such as patent ductus arteriosus, atrial septal defects, ventricular septal defects, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great vessels and more.
    • Surgery for atrial fibrillation
      Atrial fibrillation is a condition where the heart beats irregularly. To treat this condition, a procedure known as catheter ablation may be performed. It involves the insertion of a thin catheter with electrodes into the section of that heart that is causing the irregularity, in order to restore and maintain a more regular heart rhythm.
    • Surgery for heart failure
      Heart failure refers to the condition in which the heart is unable to pump an adequate supply of blood to the body’s tissues. This can lead to oedema, the build-up of fluids in the tissues. Surgery for heart failure include ventricular assist device (VAD), the use of a mechanical heart device or artificial heart, or a heart transplant.
    • Thoracic aortic vascular surgery
      Thoracic aortic vascular surgery allows surgeons to repair the aorta, the largest artery in the body, which may be weakened, narrowed or damaged in some way. It involves the insertion of a device called a stent graft, which helps to keep the artery open and allow normal blood flow.
    • Endovascular aneurysm repair
      Endovascular aneurysm repair is performed to treat an abdominal aortic aneurysm, which refers to a bulge in the wall of the large artery below the heart. Left untreated, there is a risk of tearing. To prevent this, a graft is inserted into the aneurysm through small incisions. It is an alternative to conventional abdominal surgery, with shorter recovery time.

     

    *This is not a complete list of all the diagnostic procedures and treatments available at Mount Elizabeth Hospitals. The information provided is for educational reference only and should not be seen as medical advice.

    Please consult our qualified healthcare specialists for an accurate diagnosis before starting any treatment.

    Make an Enquiry Find a Doctor

  • Our Specialists

    There are 66 SpecialistsView All

    • Agasthian T

      Specialty:
      Cardiothoracic Surgery

      View Profile

      Clinic:
      Agasthian Thoracic Surgery Pte Ltd
      Location:
      3 Mount Elizabeth #14-12
      Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre
      Singapore 228510
      Contact No:
      62688875
    • Aneez DB Ahmed

      Specialty:
      Cardiothoracic Surgery

      View Profile

      Clinic:
      International Centre For Thoracic Surgery Pte Ltd
      Location:
      38 Irrawaddy Road #10-38
      Mount Elizabeth Novena Specialist Centre
      Singapore 329563
      Contact No:
      6591 8801
    • Ang Teck Kee

      Specialty:
      Cardiology

      View Profile

      Clinic:
      Livingstone Cardiology Pte Ltd
      Location:
      3 Mount Elizabeth #14-13
      Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre
      Singapore 228510
      Contact No:
      62357536
    • Chan Wan Xian

      Specialty:
      Cardiology

      View Profile

      Clinic:
      Asian Heart & Vascular Centre
      Location:
      38 Irrawaddy Road #08-58 to 61 and #10-54 to 55
      Mount Elizabeth Novena Specialist Centre
      Singapore 329563
      Contact No:
      6339 3638
      Clinic:
      Asian Heart & Vascular Centre
      Location:
      3 Mount Elizabeth #16-07
      Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre
      Singapore 228510
      Contact No:
      68873422
    • Chee Tek Siong

      Specialty:
      Cardiology
      Sub-specialty:
      Intensive Care Medicine

      View Profile

      Clinic:
      The Heart Specialist Clinic
      Location:
      3 Mount Elizabeth #14-10
      Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre
      Singapore 228510
      Contact No:
      62358733
    • Cheng Alfred

      Specialty:
      Cardiology

      View Profile

      Clinic:
      Alfred Cheng Cardiac Care Pte Ltd
      Location:
      3 Mount Elizabeth #15-15
      Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre
      Singapore 228510
      Contact No:
      67357735
    • Chew Christopher

      Specialty:
      Cardiology

      View Profile

      Clinic:
      International Heart Clinic Pte Ltd
      Location:
      3 Mount Elizabeth #06-07
      Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre
      Singapore 228510
      Contact No:
      63338383
    • Chia Stanley

      Specialty:
      Cardiology

      View Profile

      Clinic:
      Asian Heart & Vascular Centre
      Location:
      38 Irrawaddy Road #08-58 to 61 and #10-54 to 55
      Mount Elizabeth Novena Specialist Centre
      Singapore 329563
      Contact No:
      6339 3638
      Clinic:
      Asian Heart And Vascular Centre
      Location:
      3 Mount Elizabeth #17-08
      Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre
      228510
      Contact No:
      67338638
      Clinic:
      Asian Heart & Vascular Centre
      Location:
      3 Mount Elizabeth  #16-07 and #17-08
      Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre
      Singapore 228510
      Contact No:
      6733 8638
    • Chiam Toon Lim Paul

      Specialty:
      Cardiology

      View Profile

      Clinic:
      The Heart And Vascular Centre
      Location:
      3 Mount Elizabeth #08-06
      Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre
      Singapore 228510
      Contact No:
      6735 3022
      Clinic:
      The Heart & Vascular Centre (Novena)
      Location:
      38 Irrawaddy Road #09-21
      Mount Elizabeth Novena Specialist Centre
      Singapore 329563
      Contact No:
      6694 0140
    • Chow Hui Jeremy

      Specialty:
      Cardiology

      View Profile

      Clinic:
      Asian Heart & Vascular Centre
      Location:
      38 Irrawaddy Road #08-58 to 61 and #10-54 to 55
      Mount Elizabeth Novena Specialist Centre
      Singapore 329563
      Contact No:
      6339 3638
      Clinic:
      Asian Heart & Vascular Centre Pte Ltd
      Location:
      3 Mount Elizabeth #17-08
      Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre
      228510
      Contact No:
      67338638

    There are 66 SpecialistsView All

  • Related Health Articles